Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 8/4/2017


6 Talbot, Saugus, MA 01906

Single-Family

$559,000
Price

6
Rooms
4
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
This unique home features 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Master is a new addition to the home which features a full bath, sauna and separate steam room. Before entering the large master suite you have a separate room that could be used for an office, den, or whatever meets your needs. Hugh walk in closet for lots of storage PLUS your own balcony over looking the big back yard, view of trees and a stream. This home has been remodeled with a new kitchen, granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances. Large deck off the kitchen over looking the back yard and stream. If you like to entertain, this would be a great home to buy! Large yard and plenty of parking for at least 10 cars! Fully fenced private yard offering a calming environment. This home has alot to offer! Not to mention they are building all new schools! Don't miss out!
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Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 8/1/2017

Watching a once thriving neighborhood decline is one of the hardest things to witness. It makes it hard to look outside your window. It's not easy to take in the sight of dilapidating houses, tall grass and weeds that are starting to over run the sidewalks. That may be one of the worst views to digest.

Are any of these sights keeping you from looking outside?

Sight of a declining neighborhood raises strong emotions. It surfaces happy memories that you experienced when you first saw your house. The memories serve as a sharp contrast to what you're feeling as you look outside your window now and what you felt when you first moved in.

As bad as it sounds, there are other home views that people hate. Ten home views that people hate, the very views that could be forcing you to avoid looking outside include:

  1. Less than a quarter mile from your house is a garbage dump. To avoid thinking about the health dangers that could be lurking at the garbage dump site, you keep your window treatments closed. That or you avoid looking outside one or more of your house windows.
  2. Dead trees signal change. If you've come to love the trees, the last thing that you might want to do is cut the trees down. So, you turn away from looking outside.
  3. Boarded buildings are dull. If boarding buildings have been in the neighborhood for several months, it could be a sign that local government officials don't value where you live.
  4. Pet parks that aren't well maintained are nothing to write home about. Piles of dog feces may turn your stomach when you look outside.
  5. Storm damage is another reason why you might want to look outside your window. Sight of flattened houses across the street and in the surrounding area, fallen trees and debris are not easy to look at day after day.
  6. Construction not only brings views of cement trucks, drywall and metal railings, let construction take place near where you live and you'll have to listen to banging, sawing and other loud construction sounds.
  7. Gas stations seem innocent when they are miles away from your home. When gas stations are right across the street from your house, they can become eyesores.
  8. Schools are signs of learning. They do good work in the world. They also bring rows of school buses and cars near your house. Live close to a school and you may have to limit your driving speed to 15 miles per hour while school is in session.
  9. Vacant lots are among the views that people hate to look outside their house windows and see.
  10. Chemical plants are not only unattractive. They push harmful chemicals into the atmosphere.

You deserve to feel good when you look outside your house windows. The views should be attractive and satisfying. They certainly shouldn't force you to turn away from the window when you enter certain rooms of your home. They also shouldn't force you to keep window treatments closed.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/25/2017

When you drive through a new housing development does it seem like all of the homes are enormous compared to when you were growing up? You're not alone. In fact, over the last 40 years, average home sizes have increased by over 1,000 square feet. In other words, you could fit an entire small house inside of the amount homes have grown in size.

Why do Americans love huge houses?

It's counter-intuitive that home sizes should keep growing larger. Bigger houses mean higher prices, more maintenance, and more expensive utilities. To understand why, we need look no further than the automobile industry. In spite of the fact that larger vehicles cost more to buy, use more gas, and do more harm to the environment, people still buy bigger and bigger trucks and SUVs. There are a few reasons why. One is that they can afford to (or they can at least afford the payments). Another reason is cultural. For the most part, bigger meant better in American culture--until recently. Recently, many Americans have begun saying they would prefer smaller sized houses. That desire hasn't entirely caught up to the people building the homes, however. And even as simple living trends and the "tiny house" phenomenon gain traction, building contractors still stand the most to gain from large houses and the people with the money to build houses continue to build big to stay aligned with the other homes in their neighborhood. There are other obstacles in place for people who want a smaller house. Some counties around the U.S. now enforce minimum square footage requirements to uphold the building standards of the area. So, people hoping to move to a particular suburban area but don't want a huge house might be out of luck.

How big of a home do I need?

There are a lot of things to consider if you're buying a home. Size and cost often go hand-in-hand, but even if you can afford a larger home, do you really need the space? Here are some questions to ask yourself to determine how large of a house you really need:
  • Do I or will I have a family? Kids need space. They need bedrooms and places to play. The size of your family is going to be a huge factor in choosing the size of your home.
  • Do I need all this stuff? Many people use their homes like storage containers. Think about the last time you moved and what you brought with you. Now determine how often you used the things you brought. Odds are you have a lot of items just sitting around taking up space that you don't really need.
  • Do I have hobbies that take up a lot of space? Woodworking, working on cars, playing drums... these are all examples of hobbies that call for some leg room.
  • Am I a dog person? Just like kids, pets tend to take up some room. Larger dogs and energetic dogs require more room, both outside and inside the house.
  • Do I have time to keep up with the maintenance? Bigger houses means more windows to clean, more toilets to scrub, more grass to mow... you get the idea. You might find that you'd rather have a beautiful and well-kept small home than a hard-to-maintain huge one.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/19/2017


34 Wrentham Road, West side, Worcester, MA 01602

Single-Family

$637,000
Price

10
Rooms
5
Beds
2/2
Full/Half Baths
Amazing home! Gorgeous stone entry leads to the foyer, this home is like new built in 2010. The large kitchen offers SS appliances, upscale cabinets, granite counters, stone flooring and oversize island with breakfast bar. Large formal dining room with hardwood floors and slider to patio. Formal living room with fireplace and hardwood floors. Great room with hardwood floors large enough for that big sectional! 5 bedrooms, 2 full 2 half baths, partially finished basement with half bath. Lots of Storage and lots of Closet Space. Has a long driveway that can park 8 to 10 maybe more cars plus a 2 car garage!.
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Categories: Price Change  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/18/2017

Although owning one or more dogs involves a long-term commitment of time, energy, and money, the vast majority of dog owners would have it no other way! While dog ownership isn't for everyone, few people can resist the unconditional love, playfulness, and companionship that dogs offer. If you grew up with dogs in your household and feel comfortable with them, chances are high that your home is never complete without one. Some people even get a second dog so that their first pet isn't lonely when the family is at work and school. Besides the joy of having an affectionate, four-legged companion in the house, the advantages of bringing a dog into the family are practically innumerable.

  1. Exercise: We all need regular physical activity to look and feel our best, but it's all too easy to come up with excuses for skipping a day or two. As most of us can attest to, a few days of exercise avoidance can easily turn into weeks or more of inactivity. However, since dogs require daily walks to relieve themselves and expend pent up energy, you're less likely to have a sedentary lifestyle when there's a dog in the family. Motivating us to take them for a walk and play with them, every day, is one of the countless ways dogs enhance our lives. They may even help us live longer and be healthier.
  2. Home security: Whether a dog is an intimidating German Shepherd or a fluffy, white Bichon Frise, they're still going to bark when they sense a stranger on your property. While small dogs aren't going to inspire terror in the hearts of would-be burglars, their barking has a similar effect to that of a security alarm or a motion-sensor floodlight. It's going to call attention to the potential intruder. Since one of a burglar's main objectives is to not be noticed, a barking dog -- of any size -- can be an effective deterrent.
  3. Benefits to kids: If you had a dog when you were growing up, you know what a source of joy and companionship they can be to a child. Dogs not only create fond memories for children, but they can also help teach responsibility, empathy, and compassion for other living beings.
Although dogs can bring a lot of joy to you and your family, they can also be potentially destructive, overly aggressive, and noisy. If you've ever watched the TV show The Dog Whisperer with Cesar Millan, you know how troublesome some dogs with behavioral problems can be. That's why it's important to select your dog from a reputable breeder, rather than a so-called "puppy mill," and train them properly, from day one. It also pays to research the temperament of different breeds before you decide which one would be the best match for you and your family. Some breeds are known to be high strung, while others tend to be more mellow and gentle -- a trait that's especially important with young children. It's also helpful to know in advance whether a dog sheds, whether it's prone to any medical conditions, and how much exercise it needs on a daily basis. If you don't have experience training or house breaking a dog, there are plenty of videos, books, and articles available on the Internet to provide you with the knowledge and skills to be a successful dog owner. Dog training classes are also available in most communities.