Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 2/9/2016

There are several items that will make your life a bit easier if you have a toddler. These items are easily found at a pharmacy, hardware store, and safety supply store as well as online. This list will help you be prepared and breathe easy once you are settled in to your new home or apartment. Feel free to print and use this list to help you with your new home safety check. • Safety plugs or outlet covers or place furniture in front of outlets • Secure furniture that may topple to the wall • Install a toilet seat lock • Cordless window coverings • Install window guards and stops • Move furniture away from windows and screens • Nonslip pads in the tub • Soft cover for the bathtub spout and knobs • Secure oven door with lock latch • Stove guard blocks for knobs and burners • Any fireplace items must be placed out of reach • Childproof locks on cabinets • Nonslip pads under rugs • Remove toxic household plants




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 9/29/2015

If you were to guess which area in your home poses the most safety hazards, what would be your answer?  The kitchen?  The basement? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every year about 235,000 people over age 15 visit emergency rooms because of injuries suffered in the bathroom, and almost 14 percent are hospitalized. More than a third of the injuries happen while bathing or showering. More than 14 percent occur while using the toilet. By taking some simple steps in your own bathroom, you can cut the risk of serious injury to yourself and your loves ones dramatically.

  • Install support railings right outside of your tub.
  • Put down an anti-slippage mat on the floor of your tub.
  • Take extra care when using electrical outlets in your bathroom. Install a hand towel holder next to outlets, and get in the habit of making sure your hands are dried before plugging and unplugging electrical devices.
  • Be sure that bathroom rugs around your toilet and sink have excellent anti-slip capabilities, and replace your rugs when they become worn.
After following these steps, re-evaluate your bathroom. Can you find anything else that may pose a danger?





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/14/2014

2012 has brought a rash of new West Nile Virus cases in the New England area. Many areas are now taking measures to combat further spread of the virus, from public awareness campaigns to large-scale pesticide spraying in the worst-hit areas. There are many steps you can take to minimize your exposure to the mosquitoes that carry West Nile Virus. A simple survey of your home and lawn can pinpoint trouble areas where insects would naturally congregate. Do you have any freestanding patches of water on your property? If so, fill them in with dirt. Stagnant water is typically a breeding ground for mosquitoes. If you live near a pond or lake, your city may already be treating the area to ensure mosquito levels are kept in check, but there's no harm in calling your local city health department. If you happen to own a pond, then consider stocking it with fish or some other form of life that could feed on any insect populations that find it inviting. What about guarding your home? Tight mesh window screens are your first line of defense, followed up with a citronella candle burning in the window sill if you happen to want to keep your windows open. Consider switching your outdoor light bulbs a little dimmer than usual, so as to not attract large groups of insects. Additionally, you may want to think about opting for yellow bulbs if you are in a particularly mosquito-prone area. Mindfulness is your friend here. Tell your family and friends to take care to not leave doors and windows open for too log between dusk and dawn.  Remember....Even though it's getting colder out, the West Nile risk will not significantly decrease until your area experiences its first hard frost. For more information on West Nile Virus, including up-to-the-date reports of confirmed cases, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm




Categories: Help Around the House  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 1/8/2013

When the power goes out dangers can rise. Often times there are dangers that you don't expect. Here are some tips to keep you safe when the power goes out. If you encounter down power lines: Stay away from power lines they could be live. Call 911 if a person comes in contact with a power line. Do not touch the person as the electric current could flow through you. If your vehicle comes in contact with a power line, stay inside the car. If you must leave your car, jump clear to avoid being in contact with the car and the ground at the same time. If you lose power in the summer: Close drapes and blinds on the sunny side of your home. Find an air conditioned building like a shopping mall to cool down. Drink plenty of cool liquids even if you don’t feel thirsty. Eat light and opt for foods high in water content such as fruits, salads and soups. Take baths and showers (water conducts heat away from the body). If you lose power in the winter: During the day, open your blinds to let the sun warm the space. At night, cover windows with drapes or blankets to minimize heat loss. Place heaters on a hard, non-combustible surface. If the indoor temperature drops to 55 degrees F, open faucets slightly so they drip to prevent pipes from freezing. Never use a gas range or charcoal for indoor heating. Keep a gas powered generator at least twenty feet away from your home.