Lynn D'Avolio
Century 21 North East | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 5/8/2018

It’s easy to fall in love with a house if it has all the features you’re looking for. However, it’s important not to ignore the qualities of the neighborhood the house is in as well.

The state of the surrounding neighborhood is important for many homeowners. You’ll use the local amenities, walk on the sidewalks, drive on the roads, and eventually even set the price of your home based partially on the price of those surrounding it.

In this article, we’re going to discuss some of the reasons you should pay attention to the neighborhood when shopping for homes, and what qualities to look for to find a place that has both high quality of life and resale value.  

Neighborhood Inspection 101

There are a number of things you’ll want to learn about a neighborhood before you move in. Some of them you can observe with your own eye, some you can find online via public records, and others will require talking to the locals to see what their experience has been.

Things to observe

When you go to visit a home, set aside some time beforehand to drive around the neighborhood. Check out the roads, sidewalks, and the general state of the neighborhood. Boarded up houses and closed businesses aren’t always a sign of doom and gloom, but it can give you insight into the pricing of some homes and give you some negotiating power.

If you love the house and feel okay about the neighborhood swing by during rush hour, if possible. This will give you a sense of traffic and how long it will take you to get to work from your new home.

If you’re moving into a city, it’s also a good idea to check out the after-hours scene. If a peaceful evening at home is what you seek, it will be a good idea to know ahead of time if your street comes alive at night.

Things to research

It’s a good idea to get a feel for the local culture before buying a home to see if it fits with your lifestyle. Are businesses closed on Sundays? Are there community events and clubs that you ur your family would be interested in? You can find most information online through Facebook groups, library websites, and local newspapers.

If you’re concerned with crime, you can find local data online. Similarly, records are available for local schools, such as where the town’s test scores land compared to state and national averages.

Talk to the neighbors

The most practical way to learn about a neighborhood is to ask the people who live there. They’ll be able to tell you how it has changed over the years, which will give you a sense of where the neighborhood is headed. They can tell you whether it’s a neighborhood filled with young families or aging retirees, and will likely be able to let you know if there are any problems in the neighborhood.

Aside from the local culture, you should ask your potential new neighbors about the infrastructure. Do they have frequent power issues? Is there often noisy construction, or have there been potholes that haven’t been filled for years? You can learn a lot from the people who have lived in a neighborhood for multiple years.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 2/10/2015

When searching for your dream house a lot of emphasis is typically placed on the location, size, and style of the house; ensuring everything you desire is perfectly in place.  When buying a home you can't let your emotions cloud your sense of reason.  You need to carefully examine all factors closely and perform the due diligence necessary to ensure you are making the right decision. Read Through Recent Newspapers and Archived Articles: Local news papers and other publications are a great resource for the most current information.  Archived news articles on the other hand may alert you to past issues or on going controversy in the area.  A little extra time spent reading will pay off in a long run when compiling your pros and cons list. Talk To The neighbors: The residents of the neighborhood are the best source of first hand information.  Getting a feel for the neighborhood's demographic will help determine if it is the correct environment for your family. Confirm there is a neighborhood association or alternative platform to discuss the welfare of the neighborhood. Get Details On Recent Home Improvements: Home inspections will provide you with information on where improvements may be needed.  Determining the quality of the improvements that have already been completed is also important.  Ask to review receipts from previous renovations to help gauge the quality of the materials used and the longevity of the improvement.  For example, if the house was painted a year ago, and the receipt reveals a lesser quality paint was used, you can expect to re-paint in a year or so. Review Tax Records: A review of the past and present real estate tax records will provide you with a better understanding of the area's tax rate, and property evaluation.  It's good to know how regularly homes are evaluated and how often property taxes are increased. There is so much to consider when buying a home.  Be certain to take all factors into consideration when making your decision.