Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 2/14/2017

Growing your own vegetables is a wonderful thing. You get to choose which seeds to sow, spend time outside, put in some hard work and then reap the rewards all summer and fall. In spite of this, many new gardeners find themselves planting too much or too little of different vegetables. There's much appeal to going to the store to pick out seeds. It almost seems like magic: these little seed packets will turn into baskets full of food, all for just a few dollars. Follow these tips to learn how to grow what you want the first time around so you won't find yourself begging neighbors to take all those extra zucchinis off your hands. What do you like to eat? Experimenting with new recipes is great. And so is the temptation when you see seed packets for an exotic vegetable you've never tried before. But before you dedicate a whole row of your garden to hybrid turnips, think about whether or not you'll really eat all of that. Instead, plant the veggies you and your family love to eat consistently. Before you start planting, think carefully about the amount of space you have in your garden (I usually draw a diagram and label the rows). This is going to involve some necessary research on your part. If you love summer squash, you may think you need a whole row. Squash plants, however, tend to creep outwards vigorously, producing a ton of fruit and also encroaching on other rows if you're not careful. Similarly, you may find that you simply don't have enough room for some vegetables. We all love the first sweet corn of the season, but most of us don't have enough room in our backyard gardens to feasibly grow corn. Plan for next year Once you've tilled the soil, planted the seeds, and taken care of your plants all spring, you may think the only thing left to do is harvest the vegetables. This is a crucial time, however, to think about next year. What did you have too much of? Too little? Did you find that some vegetables simply wouldn't grow in your garden? (I tried twice, with little luck, to plant pole beans but found that they just didn't like my soil.) Take note of these findings for next year. If one part of your garden receives more sunlight, try rotating crops to see if you get different results. Don't worry if your garden isn't perfect the first time around. In fact, it's best to just let go of that image of the perfect garden. Tending a garden isn't another chore to cause stress in your life, it's a simple and relaxing way to get outside more.  





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/29/2014

One may wonder, what does “Eating for good health” mean?  Eating for good health means to consume the right quantities of food, from all the food groups, in order to maintain a healthy and balanced life. A balanced diet is a crucial part of healthy eating. Here are some rules that should not be taken for granted with respect to eating well.

  • Never Skip Breakfast.   Although mornings are usually rushed and chaotic, it is best to take the time to eat a healthy breakfast for many reasons.  Did you know skipping breakfast may be linked to increasing a woman’s risk of diabetes? Eating a healthy breakfast is also connected with a lower incidence of heart disease in men. Eating breakfast helps to keep your metabolism going because your blood sugar levels drop in the morning and your body needs fuel to help keep your energy levels up. Eating breakfast just helps you perform better and helps to keep you from being irritable and grumpy.
  • Eat More Fruits and Vegetables.  People tend to underestimate the benefits that eating more vegetables and fruits can provide for the body. It is recommended that you consume at least five portions of different types of fruits and vegetables on a daily basis.  Eating an assortment of vegetables and fruits can help you avert many ailments like high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke and even prevent some types of cancer.
  • Reduce Saturated Fat. Everyone needs to reduce the amount of fat consumed on a daily basis. Fat comes in two forms, saturated and unsaturated. Excess saturated fat can increase the cholesterol levels in the blood leading to an increased risk of heart disease.  Try to cut down on foods like cakes, biscuits, butter, pies and processed foods and increase your intake of vegetables and fruits.
  • Drink Plenty Of Water. Drinking a sufficient amount of water is an essential part of eating healthy. Do not wait until you are thirsty before you drink water. Human’s need to drink about 1.2 liters of water on a daily basis.  Drinking plenty of water helps the kidneys to flush out toxins and can help the body increase energy and relieve fatigue. Did you also know that water is a natural appetite suppressant?  Drinking water before a meal helps to fill you up and raises your metabolism. So drink up, but make sure it’s zero calorie water:  wine, fruit juices and other beverages do not off the same benefits as good old water.
  • Remain Active. In addition to a healthy diet, engaging in daily exercise is beneficial in boosting your metabolism.  Regular physical activity helps the body to function better, reduces the risk of diabetes and heart disease and promotes weight loss.  For individuals that live a sedentary lifestyle, it is important to introduce physical activity gently into their daily routine.  Even engaging in light physical activity can get your muscles working and stimulate healthy blood flow. As always, an individual's physician should be consulted prior to introducing a new exercise routine.
The benefits of a healthy diet are many, even simple changes can produce noticeable results. Embracing a healthy diet will have you feeling great and full of energy in no time.