Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/4/2016

Homeowners have different amounts of time they can spend in the garden; for most of us, it is never enough. If you have a busy schedule and cannot devote a lot of time or energy to caring for your landscape, you can still have a beautiful, eye-catching garden. With a bit of research and planning, you can discover plants that thrive in your garden and require little in the way of care or maintenance. Consider about the configuration of your garden, making a sketch of areas that are sunniest and those that receive shade. Note the content of the soil. Likely some areas of your property have soil that is loamier or sandier than others. Take several soil samples from your yard, marked with the location, to your local county extension office for soil analysis and advice on what you need to do to supplement your soil and improve growing conditions. Creating a low-maintenance garden and landscape is about more than selecting the right low maintenance plants. It is important to factor in your United States Department of Agriculture Plant Hardiness Zone, your unique gardening environment and then working with it. Matching plants to the conditions in your garden and the plants requirements when you plant them, and you will have save time later. Group plants with similar water requirements together, keeping all your thirsty plants in one spot for ease of watering. Consider installing a drip irrigation which is an inexpensive and healthier way for plants to obtain moisture and a lot less work for you. Low Maintenance Plants When looking for low maintenance plants for the garden, choose perennials that you only have to plant once. Perennials and annuals that self-seed grace the garden every spring with bursts of color and fresh greenery; all without effort on your part. It is best to choose perennials rated for your USDA hardiness zone and growing conditions. If a plant grows in the wild in your “neck of the woods” it will grow in your garden. If established in the wild, the plant is acclimated to your make it through the winter where you live, tolerant of rainfall amounts, soil quality, and climate. Hardy Perennials Gardener’s in USDA hardiness zones 2 through 6 suggest peonies, butterfly weed, daffodils and tulips for sunny, permanent spots in the garden. The many different striking varieties of geranium are perfect for borders, pots, baskets, and containers, but must be dug and stored or brought indoors in areas subject to freezing. In these same hardiness zones, ferns, hostas, and bleeding heart are hardy perennials that tolerate shade and cold temperatures.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/15/2013

Thinking about changing the color of your living room? How about a color makeover for the bedroom? No matter what room of the house you are thinking about, the choice of color is important. That calming bedroom you always imagined could turn into a nightmare that won't end. Of the stunning entry way could be the eye sore of the neighborhood. Knowing a little bit about colors can help you choose the one just right for the look you are trying to achieve. The Color Wheel This is the most fundamental thing you need to know about colors. There are 2 basic groups of colors: warm and cool. Warm colors are red, yellow and orange. They are exciting colors, full of life and energy; think about fire with its glowing flames. Cool colors are more mellow, blues, greens and purples. Think of an outdoor scene, with green meadows and blue skies. The feel that you are looking for should lead you to one group of colors or the other. Color Harmony Putting just any old colors together can really be unpleasant to the eye. Color harmony is all about colors that go well together. The simplest way to think about this is when looking at a color wheel, colors that are adjacent to one another or directly across from one another compliment each other. Monochromatic color schemes work well too - where you have varying intensities of the same color. Where to start So now that you have the basics, think about the room you want to change. Would it be a place fo relaxation? Or a place for entertaining? You might think about shades of blue and green for a bedroom you can really relax in. Or shades of orange for the kitchen and dining room you love to entertain your guests in. And remember, when working with more vibrant colors, a little goes a long way. If you love the ides of red in your living room, stay away from painting the walls AND having your drapes and upholstery in shades of red. Pick one peice that will take on the spotlight, and accent that with other hues, tones, colors, etc. And now you can get small paint samples for cheap to bring home and try out. Feel free to experiment with how the colors you are thinking of would look together. What are you waiting for? Get colorful!




Tags: paint   color   painting tips  
Categories: Home Improvements