Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 2/14/2017

Growing your own vegetables is a wonderful thing. You get to choose which seeds to sow, spend time outside, put in some hard work and then reap the rewards all summer and fall. In spite of this, many new gardeners find themselves planting too much†or too little of different vegetables. There's much†appeal to going to the store to pick out seeds. It almost seems like magic: these little seed packets will turn into baskets full of food, all for just a few dollars. Follow these tips to learn†how to grow what you want the first time around so you won't find yourself begging neighbors to take all those extra zucchinis off your hands. What do you like to eat? Experimenting with new recipes is great. And so is the temptation when you see seed packets for†an exotic vegetable you've never tried before. But before you dedicate a whole row of your garden to hybrid turnips, think about whether or not you'll really eat all of that. Instead, plant the veggies you and your family love†to†eat consistently. Before you start planting, think carefully about the amount of space you have in your garden (I usually draw a diagram and label the rows). This is going to involve some necessary research on your part. If you love summer squash, you may think you need a whole row. Squash plants, however, tend to creep outwards vigorously, producing a ton of fruit†and also encroaching on other rows if you're not careful. Similarly, you may find that you simply don't have enough room for some vegetables. We all love the first sweet corn of the season, but most of us don't have enough room in our backyard gardens to feasibly grow corn. Plan for next year Once you've tilled the soil, planted the seeds, and taken care of your plants all spring, you may think the only thing left to do is harvest the vegetables. This is a crucial time, however, to think about next year. What did you have too much of? Too little? Did you find that some vegetables simply wouldn't grow in your garden? (I tried twice,†with little luck, to plant pole beans but found that they just didn't like my soil.) Take note of these findings for next year. If one part of your garden receives more sunlight, try rotating crops to see if you get different results. Don't worry if your garden isn't perfect the first time around. In fact, it's best to just let go of that image of the perfect garden. Tending†a garden isn't another chore to cause stress in your life, it's a simple and relaxing way to get outside more.  





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 6/14/2016

There are a lot of reasons you may want to line your house with plants. Maybe you need curb appeal to attract buyers to your home. Perhaps you have a foundation you want to cover. You could just like the piece of mind that comes with taking care of living plants. Whatever your reasons, I have the plants for you. There are a few things to keep in mind when planting around your house. Remember you should leave at least two foot between the side of your house and your plants. This may mean a little maintenance to your garden beds. There are a few reasons for this. You do not want plants rubbing up against your house and bringing moisture, animals, bugs, and general wear and tear to your siding. Pick the right plant for your house. What style are you looking for here? Depending on the style of your home, you may want a plant that compliments this. Letís talk about a few good options that will suit you, no matter what you are looking for.

  • Hydrangeas are a great pick for the front of your house. They attract the eye without being too ostentatious with their bell shaped pink and purple blooms. You will need three to five feet in height and spread to let them grow to their full potential. These are a great full plant to cover your plain or dare I say unsightly foundation.
  • Blue Angel Hostas love the shady spots of the yard, and are a great pick for the tree lined portions of your home. They like living in moist mulch as most shade plants do, and will need about 3 feet in height and 4 feet in spread. These hostas have big leaves and small stalk blooms. Hostas are perennials, which means they will come back each year and, bonus, they will continue to spread throughout the years. This may mean dividing the plant every few years. They make a great housewarming gifts for your friends and family at times like these.
  • Knockout Roses will last from the spring to the fallís first frost--perfect for continuous beauty. These roses are very low maintenance and easy to maintain. Make sure to cut these roses back in the winter and this will give them a great chance to come back healthy each spring. Knockout roses will need four feet in height and three feet in spread. There are a great choice for any home.
I know creating curb appeal can seem very daunting. It doesn't have to be with a few great choices, no matter your reason for sprucing up your yard. Remember, with a little bit of maintenance any homeowner can be a successful gardener. If you are ready to list your home, I am here to help you. Even if you are just want some attractive plant beds for years to come, I am happy to help you!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 12/8/2015

Planting new trees and shrubs is a perfect landscape project. Visit a few nurseries and keep on the lookout while you are driving or walking around town. You may see the tree or bush that you are looking to purchase and plant so that when you get to the store to make the purchase you know what you want. If you did your homework, you know the height and width of your new tree or bush once it matures. You also know the condition of soil and light that this tree or bush requires. Knowing this information is imperative to choosing the right tree, bush or plant for your location. Digging a hole big enough to support the roots as well as leaving room for growth is important. Be sure the plant fits nicely in the hole, not too tight. The location of the tree or bush must be far enough away from the house, wires and any other permanent structures that it may encounter in its lifetime. Spacing the tree or bush away from other trees and structures will allow it to have maximum sun and not reach for its share by growing crooked. Keeping your new tree or bush watered is an important step in allowing the plant to ďtakeĒ to its new location. Remember, this tree will be here for its lifetime, so pick a good spot and take care to set it in properly.




Tags: Planting   Trees   Landscape  
Categories: Landscaping   Gardening   Yard Improvement