Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/20/2015

Who doesn't like to save money? A penny saved is a penny earned and there are some quick and easy do-it-yourself tips that you can do around your home to help the savings add up. 1. Did you know a shorter dryer hose will make your dryer run more efficiently? You could save up to $25 a year by just trimming the dryer hose. Make sure to trim the hose length just long enough to pull the dryer a few feet out from the wall. 2. Keep the closet doors closed. Not only does it make your room look neater it will also keep you from heating or cooling more square footage. You could save up to $50 a year by just closing the closet doors. 3. Check the water heater and make sure it is set to 120 degrees.  You may have to wait a few minutes for the shower to heat up but you could also save up to $30 or more per year on gas, oil, electricity, or propane. 4. Replace all your light bulbs with energy-efficient halogen bulbs, rather than incandescents. Just by doing this you could save a whopping $20 per fixture on electricity over three years. 5. Chim chiminey, chim chim cher-ee! Get your chimney swept in the summer. Having your chimney done in the off-season will save you money by getting an off-season price. You could save approximately $50 per flue. Just doing these simple tips can save you hundreds of dollars a year.  





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 4/21/2015

It can be tempting to tackle home projects yourself but in the long run it may be better to leave some home renovations to the professionals. Here are a few projects you might want to leave off the DIY list: 1. Roofing-Roofing can be a time sink. As a do-it-yourselfer you probably will not be able to complete the project in a short enough period of time to avoid exposing your home to damage from the elements. 2. Electrical-Poor electrical work is a safety hazard.  There are safety codes that need to be followed and just because you were able to wire something and it worked, doesn't mean you haven't created a safety hazard. 3. Insulation-Homeowners often assume that installing insulation like fiberglass is an easy project. It can be easy to leave gaps that draw heat and moisture into your walls creating a much bigger problem. Insulation contractors usually get a much better deal on the material costs than you would, offsetting the cost of the labor. 4. Structural work-The structural work on a home should always be left to a professional. Structural work or changes should be drawn or approved by an engineer, whose specifications should be followed to the letter. Don't take chances here. Have you ever tackled a DIY project you thought should have been done by a professional? Share your story.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 12/31/2013

Just about every homeowner at some point will have a hole in the wall that needs repair. Repairing a hole in the wall can be inexpensive and easy. The whole process should only take about 30 to 45 minutes but will need to be done over the course of a couple days. Follow these instructions and you will be well on your way to your wall looking like new. You will need: • Sandpaper • Putty knife • Drywall patching compound (spackle or plaster) • Wall hole patch • Wet sponge or spray bottle • Wall texture spray • Paint • Paintbrush Directions: 1. Clear and remove loose drywall around the hole. Look inside and around the edges of the hole for pieces that are still attached. 2. Smooth the edges around the hole to create a surface the drywall patching compound can adhere to. 3. Remove the backing paper from the sticky side of the wall patch. Apply the sticky side of the patch around the edges of the hole, leaving at least a ˝” on each side of the hole. Smooth the edges of the patch around the hole. 4. Apply the patching compound with a putty knife liberally around the edges of the wall patch. Work your way in from the edges before getting to the middle of the wall patch. 5. Don't finishing covering the rest of the hole until the compound is dry (about 15-20 minutes). This allows the compound to partially dry so that the wall patch does not move when applying patching compound to the center of the patch. 6. Apply compound until the entire wall patch is covered. Smooth out as much as possible. The patch will still be sanded so it doesn't need to be perfect. Allow to dry overnight. 7. Sand until smooth making sure the edges are even with the rest of the wall. 8. Wipe the area down with a wet cloth and allow it to dry for 10-15 minutes. 9. Paint as needed. Your wall won’t look exactly like it did before but it will be close.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/30/2013

Choosing between satelllite television or a local provider in today's world is a lot more complicated than it was a decade ago. Cable TV has made a concentrated effort in the last decade to offer the channel variety of a satellite television service, while satellite television has tried to offer the same kind of bundle deals to their customers that make cable subscriptions so appealing to people who like the idea of an all-inclusive bill for their at-home entertainment. While both services can be very rewarding in terms of quality of service and variety, your family's entertainment needs will have to be ultimately considered if you want to make the best decision possible. In this guide, I will attempt to highlight the best features of each service, how they stack up to each other in terms of quality, and illuminate the potential drawbacks for each. Cable TV Cable television offers you an easy opportunity to condense all of your digital services into one package (Phone, tv, and internet.) While some satellite television companies offer similar packages, they usually have to hire a third-party company in order to be able to do so. And with cable television moving into the digital realm a little more every year, they are now finally providing picture quality that you could only previously get with satellite television. Additionally, you never have to worry about bad weather affecting your reception like you would if you were to chose a dish network. Also, many cable companies now offer DVR as part of their digital packages, which allows you to pause, record, and rewind any program you'd like, a service only previously available to satellite customers. If your family's home entertainment needs center around fast, high-quality internet service, and your television requirements can be satisfied without needing hundreds of channels, a cable television package will definitely suit your needs. Satellite TV While it may sound like Cable TV is the more appealing option at this point, you must consider a few things; namely, Satellite TV absolutely trumps cable in terms of the sheer variety of programs and content. Dish TV boasts a roster of 250+ channels, and the number is always growing. That includes over 80 PPV channels, whereas cable can only manage about 40. In addition, satellite television offers you a slew of international programming that a cable service simply cannot compete with. Dish TV also consistently outperforms Cable in terms of customer service ratings. But while Dish TV currently has the edge in terms of variety, your access to local programming is pretty limited. And, as mentioned previously, reception can be an issue during inclement weather. Your property will also need to have an unobstructed view of the sky in order to receive optimal reception, which can be a problem for some homeowners. As far as pricing is concerned, your television needs may be the determining factor. If having television in every room is a must for you, then opting for a cable package may suit your needs better. Satellite companies tend to offer per room fees, which can be expensive in the event that you would like the service to extend beyond one or two televisions. There is also the equipment cost to consider. While opting for a satellite package may cost you more money up front, your monthy bill will more often than not be lower than a cable package, as maintainance costs tend to be lower. For additional information on cable television, please visit www.comcast.com or www.verizon.com/fios For additional information on satellite television, please visit www.directstartv.com or www.dish.com    





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 1/29/2013

Updating your home can be costly. So any home improvement that you can do yourself will help save money. An easy update that doesn't cost too much and that you can do yourself is replacing your moulding. Whether you have basic trim, or common colonial style, there are a variety of new looks you can give to your home. To start, you'll need these tools:

  • a miter box or miter saw, for those angle cuts
  • a coping saw, for thin cuts so moulding meets flush to each other
  • finishing nails
  • a hammer, or finish nail gun
  • a nail set to sink nails below the wood surface
  • a tape measure
When making cuts, where the pieces of wood join together will determine what type of cut to make. Mitering allows for to pieces to join, like around the window. Splicing is used for long walls where one piece of wood is not enough. The moulding joins together by creating 2 45 degree angle cuts, cut opposite, creating a scarf joint, which is less noticeable. Coping is used on inside corners, where only 1 piece of wood is cut at a 45 degree angle and butts up against the other piece of wood. Your moulding doesn't have to be just the style bought at the store. Layers varies types of trim can add a more elaborate and dramatic touch. Home improvement stores will often have free booklets that give you ideas. Just remember to choose a style that matches your home. Something too dramatic in a home that is modest may look out of place. And don't forget there is more to moulding than your baseboard and window casing. Chair rails and crown moulding can really transform a room. There are a variety of decorative trims to choose from to add your own personal touch. Moulding tends to be around $1.00 a foot so depending on your room size, whether you layer trims, and if you add on elements such as chair rails, you could redo a room for a couple of hundred dollars. And make a big impact at the same time.