Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 11/4/2014

Did you know that colors can change your mood? Are you feeling like your home could use a little pick-me-up? Or maybe you want to calm down. If you need a change you could try a little color therapy. First determine if you would like your room to have a calming energy or perk you up. Then pick a color that fits your mood. Here is a list of colors and how they play into the feelings people have: Red- If you want to feel passionate or creative go with red. Do you want the kids to eat dinner every night? If so, paint the kitchen red. Red makes us feel hungry (think of all those restaurant chains). If red is too bold for the walls, use it in accents like lamps, pots and wall art to inspire. Yellow-Just like the sun, yellow makes people smile. If you go with a bold, bright yellow use it sparingly. Add an artistic flare through the use of yellow flowers or fun frames. Blue-Blue has a calming effect on a room. Looking for a place to chill-out? Use a baby-blue hue or an indigo.  Accent a room with a blue throw, rug or lamp shade. You could even try blue lights. No matter what color you choose remember to use it wisely. You never want too much of a good thing.  





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/14/2014

2012 has brought a rash of new West Nile Virus cases in the New England area. Many areas are now taking measures to combat further spread of the virus, from public awareness campaigns to large-scale pesticide spraying in the worst-hit areas. There are many steps you can take to minimize your exposure to the mosquitoes that carry West Nile Virus. A simple survey of your home and lawn can pinpoint trouble areas where insects would naturally congregate. Do you have any freestanding patches of water on your property? If so, fill them in with dirt. Stagnant water is typically a breeding ground for mosquitoes. If you live near a pond or lake, your city may already be treating the area to ensure mosquito levels are kept in check, but there's no harm in calling your local city health department. If you happen to own a pond, then consider stocking it with fish or some other form of life that could feed on any insect populations that find it inviting. What about guarding your home? Tight mesh window screens are your first line of defense, followed up with a citronella candle burning in the window sill if you happen to want to keep your windows open. Consider switching your outdoor light bulbs a little dimmer than usual, so as to not attract large groups of insects. Additionally, you may want to think about opting for yellow bulbs if you are in a particularly mosquito-prone area. Mindfulness is your friend here. Tell your family and friends to take care to not leave doors and windows open for too log between dusk and dawn.  Remember....Even though it's getting colder out, the West Nile risk will not significantly decrease until your area experiences its first hard frost. For more information on West Nile Virus, including up-to-the-date reports of confirmed cases, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm




Categories: Help Around the House  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 9/16/2014

If your home has a septic system, or you are thinking of buying a home with a septic system, you should know that septic systems need regular maintenance. Owning a septic system means getting on a schedule of checkups and clean-outs. Septic tanks should be inspected a minimum of once every two years, however, once a year is ideal.  An inspection will check sludge and scum levels and tell you how rapidly solids are accumulating in the tank. This will give you the opportunity to remediate any problems before they happen. Make sure to hire a licensed septic-field inspector. You may not need your septic pumped every year but pump it often. How often it needs to be pumped depends on several factors: tank size, size of household, volume of solids in the wastewater and how much you use the garbage disposal. Always use a licensed septic pumper and hauler to pump your tank. Keep a maintenance record on your septic system. Make note of things like the date the system was serviced, who serviced it, what work was done, and a description of the system's health.  





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 8/26/2014

A bar of soap won't just keep you clean it can serve many more purposes! Here are some uses for soap to solve common household problems: Stop squeaky hinges by wedging moist soap between the doorframe and hinge, and work the door back and forth; also rub soap directly onto the hinge. No more squeaks in floorboards when you work a little moist soap into the cracks between the boards. Unstick a stubborn zipper by rubbing soap on both sides while closed, then unzip it and rub soap over the opened teeth. Solve sticky drawers by rubbing both sides and the underside with soap. To keep eyeglasses from steaming in cold weather, rub both sides of each lens with soapy fingers, and then polish. Have any of these tricks worked for you? Share more soapy tips below.  





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 8/19/2014

Get rid of germs without using harsh chemicals. You can make lots of household cleaners without using harsh chemicals or spending a lot of money. You can even make heavy duty cleaners with common household items. It doesn't take a lot of time or money just a little mixing and you are ready to go. There are lots of different recipes but here is one way to make your own homemade heavy-duty disinfectant cleaner: Ingredients: 1/4 cup powdered laundry detergent 1 tablespoon borax 3/4 cup hot water 1/4 cup pine oil, or pine-based cleaner 1. Slowly stir the detergent and borax into the water to dissolve. 2. Add the pine oil and mix well. You can find pine oil at hardware stores. If you are using the cleaner for the bathroom cleaning, use it full strength. In the kitchen, dilute it with water.