Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/21/2014

When it comes to mortgages there is a lot to know and a lot of choices. One loan that was popular before the housing crisis was the interest-only loan. An interest-only loan is an adjustable-rate loan with an initial fixed period when only interest is due. They are typically available in 5-, 7- or 10-year terms. Economists blame interest-only loans for the foreclosure crisis citing they were issued too freely. Today, interest-only loans are more difficult to obtain. Borrowers were using interest-only loans to qualify for a more expensive home and when the interest-only term ended the payment went up leaving many homeowners unable to afford the mortgage payment. Interest-only loans are now being used by wealthy borrowers as a financial tool to help them manage irregular cash flow, reap a tax benefit, or free up cash for investment elsewhere. Lenders that offer interest-only loans have strict qualifying standards. They generally require 30 percent equity in a property, and a minimum FICO score of 720. Lenders also look at the ability to pay back the loan is based on the fully amortized payment, not the interest-only payment.    





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 9/23/2014

Trying to buy and sell a home at the same time can be tough. Sometimes these buyers and sellers are referred to as being in a sandwich because they are in the middle. The reason this can be difficult is because there is no guarantee that your new home will close at the same time as your old home. Selling and buying a home at the same time is possible but you will need help. Here are a few tips on how to get into your home while closing on your own home: 1. Hire a real estate professional. This is almost an impossible task without having a seasoned professional by your side. There are lots of details that go into selling and buying and an experienced real estate professional will know just what to do to get you to both closing tables. 2. Sell first, and then buy. This is probably the easiest and safest plan. List your home for sale and secure a buyer. You can either close on your home before purchasing another one, or ask the buyer for a contingency to allow you time to find a new home before closing on the previous one. There are many advantages to selling first, it allows you to know how much you can spend on a new home, and you don’t have to worry about temporary financing. 3. Try to schedule the closing date on the purchase of your new home on the same day, but after the closing on the home you are selling. This way, you can stay in your present home until you move into your new one. Bottom line, when it comes to selling and buying a home use the expertise of your real estate professional. Your plans may change depending on your circumstances and your local market.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 3/25/2014

Are you thinking of buying a home with a septic system? Septic systems are common in the suburbs and more rural areas where municipal sewers are not available. So what is a septic system? It is a self-contained, underground waste water treatment system. It consists of a septic tank and a drainage system. The septic tank is a large, watertight container. It can be made of concrete, steel, fiberglass, or polyethylene. The septic tank is connected to your home's sewer line and collects all water and the waste in it. The drainage system has several parts; an outflow pipe, a distribution box, a network of perforated pipes, and a leach field. When liquids inside the septic tank get high enough, they flow out of the tank into the outflow pipe. The outflow pipe leads to the distribution box which then channels waste water into the perforated pipes. The waste water is then distributed into the leach field. There is usually no cause to worry when buying a home with a septic system. It is prudent to have the septic system inspected or ask for proof of inspection during the purchase process.  If maintained properly, a septic system can last between 25 to 35 years.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 1/28/2014

Mold could be lurking in your home, often found in bathrooms, kitchens, basements, and laundry rooms. You can also find mold near leaking pipes, faulty air ducts, leaking roofs, and areas that have previously been flooded. Mold found in your home can cause you serious health problems and major damage to your home. The only way to truly know if you have a mold problem is to have a professional mold inspection. Here are a few reasons why you should hire a professional home mold inspector: 1. To see if you have hidden mold growth. A professional mold inspector has special equipment to locate mold. Hidden mold is found in places like in the drywall, under the carpets, and in the air ducts. 2. Do you suffer from allergies, coughing, or headaches? All of these could be symptoms of mold exposure. 3. Before you buy a home have a mold inspection to identify and address any mold issues before closing on the home. That way you will feel more comfortable and confident with purchasing the home. 4. Most home insurance policies do not cover major mold damage. It is important to protect your investment by knowing if the home has mold that needs to be addressed. A professional mold inspection can help protect your health and protect your investment as well.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 11/26/2013

You have earned it, you have saved your money and now is the time to buy that vacation home you have been wishing for. Buying a second home can be a very different experience than purchasing a primary residence. So, if you are in the market for a vacation home, there are some things you will need to consider first: ?What is the purpose of the home? Are you buying the second home for vacation or investment? Knowing what you intend to do with the property primarily will help you identify the features that matter most in the home. ?If the second home is for investment and you plan to rent it you will need to research how the property’s use will affect your financing options, taxes and insurance. Before you buy consult an accountant or financial planner to determine which of these factors could impact your financial situation. ?How far are you willing to travel? If you are using the home as a vacation spot, think realistically about how far you are willing to travel. According to the National Association of Realtors, 31 percent of vacation homes are typically within 100 miles of the owner's primary residence. ?See what the area is like off-season. Many times vacation homes are in seasonal destinations and the surroundings can change significantly throughout the year. Find out what challenges you may encounter in the off-season with the home. If you are thinking of buying a second home it is important to use a real estate professional with knowledge of the specific marketplace.