Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 11/3/2015

You have made the decision to put your home up for sale. Before you stick the sign in the yard there are a few things you will want to do. Buyers can be picky and the competition can be stiff. So now is the time to do all the little repairs you've always meant to do but never had the time for. Here are just a few of the basic repairs you will want to conquer before the first prospective buyer walks through the door: 1.Tackle the Entrance This is the first thing people see when they come to your home. Paint the front door and trim surrounding the door. Repair sagging screen doors and replace any missing or corroded hinge screws and tighten the rest. 2. Spruce up the Perimeter Walk the perimeter of your home, clear away dead plants, clip blossoms, and clear away leaves and other yard waste. 3. Recheck the roof Any problem that has the word roof in it scares a buyer away immediately. Replace missing shingles and fix hanging gutters.  Remove any moss growing on the roof as this shows signs of neglect. 4. Clear and caulk gutters. Clear all the debris out of the gutters and recaulk the gutter end caps. 5. Patch nail holes and repaint. Patch up nail holes in the walls of your home. Use a lightweight putty to fill the holes and paint the repaired spots. 6. Clean the Grout Deep clean tile grout with bleach.  Regrout tiles where needed and recaulk cracks between sinks, tubs, toilets, counters and floors. This will give your tile a whole new look. 7. Stop Dripping Faucets Fix leaky faucets before the buyer notices them.  You may need to call in a plumber to do this task. Before you do that you can shut off the water supply and check for moisture on the wall around the valves and on the floor of the sink cabinet. Many hardware stores carry faucet rebuild kits that contain the 6 to 12 parts most likely to fail, including the metal ball, O rings, springs and gaskets.    





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/27/2015

A dishwasher is a luxury we often take for granted. Did you know there is a right and a wrong way to wash your dishes in the washer? To get the most out of your appliance follow these simple guidelines. Use only the recommended amount of detergent. Using too much detergent can leave behind a residue on your dishes. Run only full loads of dishes; this saves on water and electricity. Don't pack dishes too tightly. The washer needs to be able to spray water and get to all of the dishes. When loading the dishes stacking items facing downward and inwards. Make sure all the arms can spin freely before running the dishwasher. Don't rinse dishes by hand use the Rinse-Hold cycle. This can waste an extra 20 gallons of water per load; that is 6,500 gallons per household each year. If you have hard water use a rinse aid. Rinse aids help dishes dry quicker,  preventing droplets from forming on your dishes. Don't use rinse aid if you have a water softener. Dry dishes on the lowest temperature setting. Higher temperatures leave spots on glassware. Check the labels of your dishes to see what if dishwasher safe. Following these simple tips will have your dishes cleaner and your washer running for many years to come.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/20/2015

Who doesn't like to save money? A penny saved is a penny earned and there are some quick and easy do-it-yourself tips that you can do around your home to help the savings add up. 1. Did you know a shorter dryer hose will make your dryer run more efficiently? You could save up to $25 a year by just trimming the dryer hose. Make sure to trim the hose length just long enough to pull the dryer a few feet out from the wall. 2. Keep the closet doors closed. Not only does it make your room look neater it will also keep you from heating or cooling more square footage. You could save up to $50 a year by just closing the closet doors. 3. Check the water heater and make sure it is set to 120 degrees.  You may have to wait a few minutes for the shower to heat up but you could also save up to $30 or more per year on gas, oil, electricity, or propane. 4. Replace all your light bulbs with energy-efficient halogen bulbs, rather than incandescents. Just by doing this you could save a whopping $20 per fixture on electricity over three years. 5. Chim chiminey, chim chim cher-ee! Get your chimney swept in the summer. Having your chimney done in the off-season will save you money by getting an off-season price. You could save approximately $50 per flue. Just doing these simple tips can save you hundreds of dollars a year.  





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/13/2015

The kitchen stove is a common cause of fire in the home. The usual culprit of a stove top fire is grease which can be very dangerous and can spread quickly. It is important to know how to react when a grease fire happens. Here are some tips for putting out a stove top fire, should it happen to you: If the fire starts from grease in a pan, put a metal lid on top of the pan to smother the flames. Turn off the burner but don't move the pan. Leave the lid on until the fire is completely extinguished. If you have it handy you can use baking soda to put out the fire. Never use water on a grease fire, it will make it worse. An ABC, dry chemical fire extinguisher can also be used effectively on grease fires. It is important to keep a small multi-purpose extinguisher in an easily accessible area of your kitchen. Never try to carry the fire outside. Moving the pan may cause the grease to splash, spread the fire, and cause burns. In case of an oven fire, turn off the oven and leave the door closed. After the fire is out, let the oven cool completely. If the fire becomes more than you can handle, leave and call 911 from a neighbor's house.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 9/29/2015

If you were to guess which area in your home poses the most safety hazards, what would be your answer?  The kitchen?  The basement? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every year about 235,000 people over age 15 visit emergency rooms because of injuries suffered in the bathroom, and almost 14 percent are hospitalized. More than a third of the injuries happen while bathing or showering. More than 14 percent occur while using the toilet. By taking some simple steps in your own bathroom, you can cut the risk of serious injury to yourself and your loves ones dramatically.

  • Install support railings right outside of your tub.
  • Put down an anti-slippage mat on the floor of your tub.
  • Take extra care when using electrical outlets in your bathroom. Install a hand towel holder next to outlets, and get in the habit of making sure your hands are dried before plugging and unplugging electrical devices.
  • Be sure that bathroom rugs around your toilet and sink have excellent anti-slip capabilities, and replace your rugs when they become worn.
After following these steps, re-evaluate your bathroom. Can you find anything else that may pose a danger?