Lynn D'Avolio
J. Barrett & Company | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 5/19/2020

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

If you are ready to move into a luxury home. You'll find options in most locations in any state you desire. Before you choose, especially if you plan on moving to another state, you should first tackle some other questions.

Work

Do you need to keep working to enjoy the lifestyle you have now? If you do, can you find work that will provide you with a similar income? If you own a business, how hard will it be to get that business going in another state? If your business is conducted online only, that is one less thing you will have to worry about — but you do have to find out how businesses are treated in the state you choose to move to. It is not beneficial to run a business in some states because of the extra taxes and regulations that some states have.

Urban, Suburban or Rural

It’s no secret that you can get more house for the money in certain states, and, breaking it down further, more house for the money in certain areas of the state. For example, to get a luxury home with at least five bedrooms near or in a large city, you’re going to have to shell out much more than you would if you picked the same house 100 miles away from the city, as long as the location is not near another large city or a tourist area.

Are you looking for something that doesn’t take a ton of maintenance? You might prefer a luxury home in the city with a small yard. If you like the idea of spreading out, having a large pool, hot tubs, stables, riding trails, ATV trails and other amenities on your property, you’ll have better luck finding that in a rural area.

Commuting and Schools

If you have school-age children, check the rating of the schools. Just because you live in a luxury neighborhood doesn’t mean that the schools for that neighborhood have a good rating. Additionally, you might have to take your children to school if you live too far out for the school bus. And, on the subject of commuting, if you have to work to maintain your lifestyle, you’ll have to commute if you choose a rural luxury home. How long is the commute? Is it something that you can manage or will that commute take too much time away from your family?

Nightlife and Attractions

If you like to go out a lot, living an hour out of town might not be for you, as much as you like a property. If you have to be in the thick of things, you might prefer a luxury neighborhood in an urban or suburban setting. If you want peace and quiet, and prefer connecting with nature, then you might choose a rural luxury home, such as a large ranch or a home with large acreage.




Tags: buyer tips   luxury   location  
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Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 5/12/2020

For homebuyers, a home inspection is paramount. This inspection enables you to look closely at a house and identify any problem areas. It also may force you to rethink your decision to buy a house, particularly if you discover a wide range of problems during the inspection.

Ultimately, it pays to consider your options following a home inspection. In fact, if you take an in-depth approach to potential home repairs, you can determine whether to ask a seller to complete these repairs before you finalize a purchase agreement.

Before you ask a seller to perform home repairs, there are several questions that you should consider, and these are:

1. How much will it cost to complete assorted home repairs?

A damaged roof is much more expensive to repair than a defective light fixture. Fortunately, if you assess the costs of potential home repairs, you can differentiate major home repairs from minor ones and plan accordingly.

If a home requires thousands of dollars in repairs, it may be worthwhile to ask a seller to complete these repairs. Otherwise, you'll be responsible for allocating the necessary time and resources to perform costly home repairs after you finalize your house purchase.

On the other hand, minor home repairs may be easy to handle on your own. If you feel comfortable completing minor home repairs, you may want to avoid submitting a request to a seller to perform these repairs. Because if you ask a seller to complete myriad minor home repairs, he or she may walk away from a potential home sale.

2. Are there any required repairs that must be completed right away?

Required repairs, i.e. repairs that will address hazardous conditions in a house, sometimes will need to be completed following a home inspection. These repairs include water penetration issues and local code safety violations.

If required repairs go unaddressed, your lender is unlikely to provide you with the financing that you need to acquire a house. Thus, you should request a seller complete these repairs as soon as possible.

3. Is it worth my time to ask a seller to complete home repairs?

There is no right or wrong answer to the aforementioned question, as every homebuyer and home seller is different. If you are uncomfortable with a house following an inspection, you should examine the inspection report and determine the best course of action. And if you feel that asking a seller to perform home repairs is essential, it is important to do just that.

Lastly, if you need assistance throughout the homebuying journey, it helps to work with an expert real estate agent. This housing market professional usually will attend a home inspection and help you assess a house. Plus, an expert real estate agent is happy to provide recommendations and suggestions to ensure you can make an informed home purchase.

Take the guesswork out of evaluating a house following an inspection – consider the aforementioned questions, and you can determine whether to ask a seller to complete home repairs after an inspection.




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Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 5/5/2020

As a home seller, it is important to make your house a must-have for buyers. Otherwise, your home may linger on the real estate market for an extended period of time. Worst of all, you may struggle to optimize your house sale earnings.

Ultimately, there are lots of things you can do to make your house an attractive option to dozens of prospective buyers, including:

1. Upgrade Your Home's Curb Appeal

Curb appeal is crucial, particularly for a seller who wants to stir up significant interest in his or her residence. If you allocate time and resources to upgrade your house's curb appeal, you could help your residence stand out from other available homes.

It generally won't take long to improve a house's curb appeal. In some instances, a seller can mow the lawn, trim the hedges and perform minor lawn care tasks to transform a house's exterior. Also, it may be beneficial to repair or replace any damaged home siding.

2. Eliminate Clutter

If your home is loaded with personal belongings, you may want to remove these items. That way, you can show off the full size of your home to buyers during showings and open house events.

To cut down on clutter, you can rent a storage unit and use it to hold various personal belongings until your residence sells. In addition, you can always donate any unwanted items to charity, give them to family members or friends or sell them as part of a yard sale.

3. Enhance Your Home's Interior

A neat, tidy home interior can make a world of difference in buyers' eyes. Thus, if you clean your residence from top to bottom, your house could impress buyers as soon as they walk through the front door.

Of course, if you need help with upgrading your house's interior, you can employ a home cleaning company. By shopping around for home cleaning companies in your city or town, you are sure to find a professional cleaning firm that offers the right combination of affordability and convenience.

As you get set to navigate the home selling journey, don't forget to hire a real estate agent, either. If you have a real estate agent at your side, you can receive plenty of support as you try to generate buyers' interest in your house.

A real estate agent understands what it takes to promote a house to the right groups of prospective buyers. As such, he or she will craft a custom home selling strategy designed to help you showcase your residence to potential buyers. Plus, a real estate agent will host house showings and keep you up to date with buyer feedback. And if you receive an offer to purchase your home, a real estate agent will help you weigh the pros and cons of accepting this proposal.

Ready to sell your house? Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you can seamlessly navigate the home selling journey.




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Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 4/28/2020

Image by Mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

When it’s time to sell your home, it’s important to make sure it’s done right. Certain selling mistakes could lead to less money for your home than you wanted or other problems that make this process more complicated than it needs to be. Before you put your home on the market, keep these common home selling mistakes in mind, so you can avoid them.

Setting a Price That’s Too High

Although you’ll want to get as much as you can for your home, setting a listing price that is too high could keep buyers away. The price you set for your home should be based on different factors, such as how much similar homes have been selling for in your area or whether or not you’ve made any upgrades that boost the value of your house. Keep in mind that according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the typical home stayed on the market for just 3 weeks before being sold. Having a listing price that is too high could lead to a much longer time on the market for your home.

Skipping Major Repairs

If you’re eager to sell your home, you might be tempted to skip major repairs. While this saves you time and money now, it can make it much more difficult to sell your home. You might also end up having to lower your price considerably, since buyers will factor in the cost of these repairs when making their bid.

Grabbing the Highest Offer

While the highest offer might seem like the right one to take, this isn’t always the case. Buyers who are offering the highest bid might include contingencies that make their offer more costly than it seems in terms of money or time. For example, they might include a contingency that they need to sell their own home before buying yours. Rather than focusing on the highest offer, it’s better to look for the best offer, which depends on different factors, such as how soon you want to sell or how much you’re willing to include for seller credits toward repairs.

Deciding Not to Hire a Real Estate Agent

Working with a real estate agent provides you with guidance and expertise while selling your home. Your agent can help you get a better price for your home and attract potential home buyers with open houses and home staging. According to NAR, 91 percent of sellers hired real estate agents to assist them with selling their home. These sellers were able to sell their homes for 99 percent of their listing price. Choosing to sell without a real estate agent could significantly affect how long it takes to sell your home and how much you get for it.




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Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 4/21/2020

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Image by StartupStockPhotos from Pixabay

Unless you're a first-time home shopper, you'll need to acquire your next home while selling your current home. How do buyers finesse this?

When buyers are competing with each other for a tight inventory of available homes, the ones who are ready to come to the table fastest, not the ones with contingencies, are most likely to succeed.

So, what's an ordinary buyer to do? Here are the top solutions—not all for the faint of heart!

  • The collaboration: Ask the buyer of your current home to go ahead to closing, but let you rent it for a month or two past then. If the buyer really wants your place and is in the position to do it, your problem is solved. Obviously, this arrangement isn't for all buyers. But every situation is unique, and this might work for yours.
  • The photo finish: Plan to schedule simultaneous closings on both homes, if a motivated, approved buyer can agree to wait for you to complete your purchase. It's been done. There is some risk here, not to mention moving van challenges! If your buyer has to pull out for any reason, you may still have to close on your new home. 
  • The bridge loan solution: With a bridge loan, you can purchase a home before selling, borrowing against your current home equity until you have the sale proceeds in hand. These are meant to be short loans. A bridge loan will get pricey if your home takes longer than expected to close. Steer clear of depending on this kind of loan for more that the span of a few weeks.
  • The contingent offer: You can line up a new home without having to take on the new mortgage until you're done with your sale. Yet few sellers are happy to accept contingent offers and hold on until a buyer's home sells. Contingent offer agreements usually only stay open for about 60 days and often have clauses that can accelerate the buyer's need to commit, allowing the seller to accept another offer. 
  • The sell-and-hotel method: This is a good way to reduce risks. Sell your home, take stock of your bank account, and know exactly what you can comfortably purchase. Store any furnishings you plan to take with you, and get a short-term rental for yourself. This means moving twice, but it also means you have money from the sale, and you're not buried under two mortgages.

Selling one home to buy the next makes the already complex matter of home buying...more so. But an experienced real estate agent can lead along the best path for your circumstances and put you in touch with financial professionals where needed. 




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