Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/29/2014

One may wonder, what does “Eating for good health” mean?  Eating for good health means to consume the right quantities of food, from all the food groups, in order to maintain a healthy and balanced life. A balanced diet is a crucial part of healthy eating. Here are some rules that should not be taken for granted with respect to eating well.

  • Never Skip Breakfast.   Although mornings are usually rushed and chaotic, it is best to take the time to eat a healthy breakfast for many reasons.  Did you know skipping breakfast may be linked to increasing a woman’s risk of diabetes? Eating a healthy breakfast is also connected with a lower incidence of heart disease in men. Eating breakfast helps to keep your metabolism going because your blood sugar levels drop in the morning and your body needs fuel to help keep your energy levels up. Eating breakfast just helps you perform better and helps to keep you from being irritable and grumpy.
  • Eat More Fruits and Vegetables.  People tend to underestimate the benefits that eating more vegetables and fruits can provide for the body. It is recommended that you consume at least five portions of different types of fruits and vegetables on a daily basis.  Eating an assortment of vegetables and fruits can help you avert many ailments like high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke and even prevent some types of cancer.
  • Reduce Saturated Fat. Everyone needs to reduce the amount of fat consumed on a daily basis. Fat comes in two forms, saturated and unsaturated. Excess saturated fat can increase the cholesterol levels in the blood leading to an increased risk of heart disease.  Try to cut down on foods like cakes, biscuits, butter, pies and processed foods and increase your intake of vegetables and fruits.
  • Drink Plenty Of Water. Drinking a sufficient amount of water is an essential part of eating healthy. Do not wait until you are thirsty before you drink water. Human’s need to drink about 1.2 liters of water on a daily basis.  Drinking plenty of water helps the kidneys to flush out toxins and can help the body increase energy and relieve fatigue. Did you also know that water is a natural appetite suppressant?  Drinking water before a meal helps to fill you up and raises your metabolism. So drink up, but make sure it’s zero calorie water:  wine, fruit juices and other beverages do not off the same benefits as good old water.
  • Remain Active. In addition to a healthy diet, engaging in daily exercise is beneficial in boosting your metabolism.  Regular physical activity helps the body to function better, reduces the risk of diabetes and heart disease and promotes weight loss.  For individuals that live a sedentary lifestyle, it is important to introduce physical activity gently into their daily routine.  Even engaging in light physical activity can get your muscles working and stimulate healthy blood flow. As always, an individual's physician should be consulted prior to introducing a new exercise routine.
The benefits of a healthy diet are many, even simple changes can produce noticeable results. Embracing a healthy diet will have you feeling great and full of energy in no time.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/15/2014

Did you know that your kids can lose from one to three months of learning over the summer? Studies suggest kids lose the most in math. Don't spend the summer going in reverse. There are many online sites that can help stop the summer brain drain. National Geographic Kids: offers great nature videos, activities, games, stories, and more CoolMath4Kids: take a trip through an amusement park of math and more at this extremely interactive math website Smithsonian Kids Collecting: how to start your own collection and see what other kids collect Explore Dinosaurs: FAQs and top 10 myths about dinosaurs, a virtual dig, behind the scenes tours, and more from the National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Digging for Answers: a site that tests your research skills and knowledge NASA Quest: interactive explorations that engage students in real science and engineering. Topics include robots, helicopters, lunar exploration, and designing your own human-friendly planet My Wonderful World: a multimedia tour of our seven continents Time for Kids: fun games (The Great State Race), an online weekly magazine written for kids, and news from around the world Big Universe: an online library of fiction and nonfiction books for kids 0-12. The site also offers adults and kids the chance to create and publish their own stories.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 6/4/2013

Who doesn't love a vegetable garden? There is nothing better than fresh green beans or vine-ripened tomatoes. Getting started with your very own vegetable garden is easier than you think. It all starts with choosing the right crops and space for your garden. 1. Choose your vegetables. Only grow vegetables you enjoy eating. Don't waste your efforts on things you will not eat or give away. There are some vegetable which are extremely well suited for eating fresh. Most people agree that tomatoes, squash, beans and peas are especially good from the garden. 2. Pick your space. You will want to pick an area that is flat, has easy access and gets full sun 3. Prepare your space. Preparing the soil is one of the most important parts of the garden. Make sure the soil is free from rocks and weeds. Make sure to turn the soil. You may also want to add organic material such as compost. It is best to consult the garden center for what they recommend. 4. Plant accordingly. Figure out how much growing space you have and plant accordingly. Lettuce, for example, can be grown in a solid mat, but tomatoes need to be spaced about 2 feet (60 cm) apart. Give pumpkins at least 4 feet (120 cm) of growing room. Growing requirements are provided on seed packets, in catalogs, and on nursery tags, as well as in books on growing vegetables. 5. Schedule your plantings. There are two main growing seasons which vary by region: cool (spring and fall) and warm (summer). Vegetables that typically do well in the cool-season are lettuce, peas, potatoes, and beets. Warm-season crops include beans, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, melons, peppers, pumpkins, squash and tomatoes. Consult your garden center for the time of year and what is best in your area. 6. Enjoy the fruits or veggies of your labor.